Reconciliation Summer Reading List? “At the Bridge: An Anthropology of Belonging”

[EDITOR NOTE:  I wrote this blog piece for my personal blog rebeccaj63.wordpress.com], but I am re-posting it here as I think it is something that may be of interest to Law folks looking for resources for TRC-engaged teaching and learning.  This book is a goldmine re h TRC#28’s call for education about Indigenous law, Aboriginal-Crown relations, conflict-resolution and intercultural competency.]

20200528_171147_hdrLooking for a good read this summer, during COVID times?  One of my favourite books of the year is Wendy Wickwire’s book,  At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging (UBC Press, 2019).

Now, you may be thinking “I don’t know who James Teit is”, or “Anthropology isn’t really my thing.”   I would encourage you to push past those responses, and say that if you give this book a try, you will come away being so happy to have built a relationship with James Teit, and I suspect you may also come away feeling connected in a more intimate way to the places you live (where ever those places are) and feeling more  hopeful about the ways we all may choose, in these difficult times, to become anthropologists of belonging.  In concrete terms, here is what it says on the back cover of the book:

Every once in a while, an important historical figure makes an appearance, makes a difference, and then disappears from the public record.  James Teit (1864-1922) was such a figure.  A prolific ethnographer and tireless Indian rights activist, Teit spent four decades helping British Columbia’s Indigenous people in their challenge of he settler-colonial assault on their lives and territories.  At the Bridge chronicles Teits’s fascinating story:  From this base at Spences Bridge, BC, Teit practised a participant-based anthropology that covered much of BC and northern Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. Whereas his contemporaries, including famed anthropologist Franz Boas, studied Indigenous peoples as the last survivors of “dying cultures” in need of preservation in metropolitan museums, Teit worked with them as members of living cultures actively asserting jurisdiction over their lives and lands.  At the Bridge lifts this story from obscurity.

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It bugs me knowing Boas published this photo of Teit and Ankto photo without identifying them.

I was excited when this book came out, in part because I had already encountered Teit.  Or at least, I knew his name.  For several years, I had been part of a partnership between ILRU (the Indigenous Law Research Unit at UVic) and the SNTC (The Shuswap Nation Tribal Council) working on a number of the Secwépemc Law projects. In these projects, we were asked to work with a number of Secwépemc storied legal resources, and to draw on a number of those gathered by James Teit at the turn of the last century (You can see a copy of the Lands and Resources Law Research Project here).  All this to say, I knew that his name was on the monograph from which we drew these resources.  But I knew next to nothing about Teit himself.

And now, I love him.   Seriously.  And I love thinking about his Nlaka’pamux wife Antko, and the place of women in this important story.  And I love the book.   You know I love a book if I lay traces of my pens and highlighters so thickly across the paper.  20200528_171439_hdrMy copy of the book pretty much looks like this…..  I couldn’t help myself!  (sorry to you librarian folk out there who try to maintain book purity). But the text simply drew me into engagement, and there were just so many things i wanted to be able to return to. While my kids (nearly adult man-cubs?) have not yet ‘read’ the book (physically run their eyes over the pages), they both have a good sense of what is there:  while I was reading, I was constantly stopping to interrupt them in their other endeavours, so I could read them different sections from the book.

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A treat to see pages from his field notes, always identifying specific storytellers, weavers, hunters…

It is just chock-a-block full histories that need knowing.   And it is written in such an accessible style, whether one is a theorist, a historian, a  teenager, a community member, a health care worker, an environmentalist, a linguist, a knitter, a basket maker.  Beautifully thoughtful and inviting.

I also think it should be mandatory reading for anyone teaching in a law school (OK.  Not that I would “mandate” anything, but I think people would WANT to have access to this one).

The day I finished my first read through of this book, I sent the following note out to my law school colleagues, detailing all the reasons I think this book should be on all our shelves, and should be drawn into our teaching, our research, and our practices of engaging in the socio-political world around us.  I still stand by that analysis.

Hi all:

I have been reading my way through Wendy Wickwire’s new book At the Bridge: An Anthropology of Belonging, and wanted to put the word out that I think this book might be the “must read” book of the year.  I have been thinking about how it is a game changer in a number of areas:

1. People teaching in BC law schools – I feel like the historical pieces of BC finally started settling into place with this book
2.  People teaching constitutional law – wow to the ability of this book to get at both confederation questions and federalism ones
3.  People thinking about reconciliation stuff — the story of James Teit is so absolutely inspiring in terms of seeing indigenous/settler collaborations and working relationships
4.  People working on any of the transsystemmic questions — this book gets at the legal orders in the BC interior
5.  People thinking about the history of Victoria and Vancouver Island — I just think this book should be taught in all the high schools here too.
6.  People looking for models and pathways for how we begin to have more complex engagements of law at the current juncture.
7.  People cautious about the place of anthropology in our legal work — this book makes visible multiple ways of doing anthropology, and provides tools for distinguishing the kinds of approaches that are more and less helpful/valuable (indeed, left me feeling rather inspired about the possibilities of acting otherwise)
Anyways…. I think it would be a great choice for a faculty “book club” read.   This will be an amazing resource for us here in the law school, and I am really keen on having others to talk to about the book (and ways to think about drawing this book into our resources in both first year and upper year courses)

Wendy Wickwire’s At the Bridge is one of those books that has shifted my sense of history, and my sense of what is possible when it comes to walking the path of respectful relations, and taking seriously the hopeful potential in decolonizing actions.  What James Teit did (as a settler to Canada) is possible for all of us to do.  He offers us a pathway.  It is ours to walk.

Teaching with Love: Inside and Outside the Law School Classroom

Author meets Readers: Law’s Indigenous Ethics[1]

Laws Indigenous Ethics

 

A question that I have been thinking about for a while is some version of “What role should love play in a legal education?”

The question is partly prompted by the work of bell hooks, when she argues — “When as teachers we teach with love, combining care, commitment, knowledge, responsibility, respect, and trust, we are often able to enter the classroom and go straight to the heart of the matter.  That means having the clarity to know what to do on any given day to create the best climate for learning.”[2]

It is also partly prompted by the work of Susan Bandes, and other scholars of Law and Emotions, who argues with her colleague Jeremy Blumenthal that “there is mounting evidence that emotion cannot be cordoned off from ethical and moral judgment without impairing both ethical judgment and well-being; such evidence has broad implications for the teaching and practice of law.”[3]

My recent thinking on love and legal education is also deepened by three Scottish colleagues who in the Fall of 2019 rode their bicycles between the six Scottish law schools, offering workshops on (amongst other things) the role art can play in critical feminist pedagogy, and in particular feminist judgment.  They argue, in the words of Patricia Williams, “It really is possible to see things – even the most concrete things – simultaneously yet differently.”[4]

Is bringing the body/art/emotion into the study and practice of law one means of bringing love into a legal education?

So, you will imagine my delight when I first picked up my colleague John Borrows’ book, Law’s Indigenous Ethics, and read these words: “Love is an important internal self-explanation for many public-spirited actions.  So, I ask the question again: Why are concepts of love absent in legal language and debate?”[5]

My contribution here today flows from a read of Chapter One[6] in conversation with Chapter Five[7] – what might happen in legal education, at this critical moment on the planet, if we took seriously love as necessary practice and reimagined the walls that silo us inside classrooms?

Chapter One looks carefully at love as a legal principle, one of the seven Grandmother/Grandfather laws, and its place in the language of rights and obligations throughout Canadian Law.  Chapter Five offers some on the ground storytelling of how to take a love as a legal principle out of the classroom and onto the land, figuratively and metaphorically.

I start my reflections by drawing on the techniques of “found poetry”; pulling insights from reading Gift One: Love in conversation with Gift Five: Wisdom.  I conclude by offering some thoughts on how to take up John’s challenges about love, law and pedagogy, for transformative teaching.

 

1.      Found Poetry[8]

 

Her voice was clear; its strength was unmistakeable.  She called to the ends of the earth and sky.
When you don’t know where to turn, open this bundle – the laws within will guide you, even if they don’t settle every question.
How is love relevant?  Why are concepts of love absent in legal language and debate?

Love should be perceptible; it should swell, expand and project itself into our relationships.
While some of this instruction can occur in the classroom, walls can hide important legal resources.
We must beware of the dangers of a single story.

Many laws flowing from our political processes are designed to enhance freedom, autonomy and choice.
Law is not just about force – it also requires our participation and agreement.
We must join our best legal insights to help one another avoid the misery, pain, and destruction all societies face when love fails to guide their actions.

The language of love can be dangerous and we must be exceedingly wary of its appearance.
Languages of love must be decolonized; appeals to love must always be contextual.
Air, fire, water, earth, plants, animals and fish.

We learn differently when we change the physical context; engaging all of our senses.
When students learn in an embodied way these lessons can be more deeply internalized.
Constitutions, statutes, regulations, by-laws, declarations, adjudicative judgments, songs, carvings, textiles, dances, wampum belts, scrolls, and petroglyphs.

Law is a human tool – a resource for reasoning and acting.
In contemporary Canada, political and legal language seems generally devoid of references to love.
We learn differently when we change the physical context; engaging all of our senses.

I found my source of strength.
Outside.
Beware the dangers of a single story.

 

2.     So…

 

It might seem obvious that when you teach courses, like I do, on Family Law and Queering Law, that love is something that needs to be addressed, if not integrally.  Love is love is love, they say.  But the question I am trying to answer is not just about language for talking about the physical dimensions of love, and it is not just for the “pink ghetto.”  The question I am trying to answer is as relevant to Constitutional Law, or Securities Law, for courses taught transsystemically, in the field and on the land, as online, or in clinics.  What is experiential learning?

At this moment, where it seems like we are living in a universe more prone to hate, than to love, this text gently demands that we stop and listen to the seven Grandmother/Grandfather teachings. It asks us to see how love inhabits our public spaces, informs s. 35 of the Constitution and is essential to readings of treaties and other texts.  It is also wary and critical of love’s place in political life.  Like law, love cannot be forced, its powers too are easily abused.[9]

Beware the dangers of a single story.[10]

What I take away from this book about legal ethics and the legal imaginary, is that love is complicated, but deeply woven into the fabric of law.  To not find a way to bring love into legal education is to miss offering students another lens of analysis, another way to read texts, another way to deepen their skills for how to work through and across trauma.  To enhance the ethical imaginations of our future ethical professionals.  Lots of work to do, though to see love as law.

At this moment when it seems that people are more likely to build walls to keep us out, this book deconstructs those walls, metaphorically and actually, to move students out of the classroom and onto the land, or into community, or into their bodies, or inside an idea.  It is thick with stories of how these 7 laws are in action at different law schools across the country, of how deep learning results from bodies engaging with law in unexpected ways and places. In field schools, in downtown Victoria, under bridges in Vancouver.[11]

John’s stories are of the relationship between law, land and learning; I aim to take up those challenges, playing with the notion of what it means to be outside.

By pushing, conceptually, what might happen if we are to weave thick notions of love into a legal education, John revisions what experiential education means.  And, in so doing, offers ways to respond to the TRC, to MMIWG, to #MeToo.  Drawing deeply on examples of placed-based teaching spaces hope is created for alternative notions of where learning happens.  More ways to think about moving students out of their heads and into their bodies to become the ethical professionals we believe they can be.

Found poetry, art bombs, finding Indigenous plants, image theatre, playreading, theatre of the oppressed, baking, dancing with dichotomies, mask and mural making, movies.[12]

I think the answer is: be brave, and things will happen.

When you don’t know where to turn, open this bundle – the laws within will guide you, even if they don’t settle every question.

 

[1]              This presentation was part of a panel dedicated to discussion of John Borrows’ most recent text, Law’s Indigenous Ethics (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019).  Thank you to Freya Kodar for organizing, to my co-panellists, Pooja Parmar, Christine Sy, Jean-Paul Restoule and John Borrows, and to our audience for their rapt attention and feedback.

[2]              bell hooks, Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope (London: Routledge, 2003) at 134.

[3]              Susan A. Bandes and Jeremy A. Blumenthal, “Emotion and the Law” (2012) 8 Annual Review of Law and Social Science 161-181 at 175.

[4]              See Sharon Cowan, Chloë Kennedy, Vanessa E. Munro, eds., Scottish Feminist Judgments: (Re)Creating Law from the Outside In (Hart Publishing, 2019) at 1, citing Patricia Williams, The Alchemy of Race and Rights ( Cambridge , MA , Harvard University Press , 1991) at 150.

[5]              Borrows, supra note 1 at 27.

[6]              Borrows, ibid., “Nitam-Miigiwewin: Zaagi’idiwin (Gift One: Love), Love: Law and Land in Canada’s Indigenous Constitution” at 24-49.

[7]              Borrows, ibid., “Naano-Miigiwewin: Nibwaakaawin (Gift Give: Wisdom), Wisdom: Outsider Education, Indigenous Law, and Land” at 149-175.

[8]              I have been inspired by the work of Kate Sutherland to bring poetry into the law school classroom.  This has included reading poetry, but also using creative writing techniques to inspire students to write poetry; drawing on resources from their legal training.  Found poetry is one of these techniques, essentially creating a poem by taking words, phrases or passages from other sources and reimagining them.  The poem that follows is comprised of words, phrases and passages from Law’s Indigenous Ethics.  For a discussion by Kate Sutherland of writing poetry in the law school classroom see: Kate Sutherland, “Law, Poetry, and Pedagogy: Reading and Writing Poems in the Law School Classroom” in Christina A. Corcos, ed., The Media Method: Teaching Law with Popular Culture (Durham: Carolina Academic Press, 2019) at 399-414.

[9]              Chapter One is a love story; including interrogation of how love informs Canadian common law and Canadian Constitutional Law and how it sits within the seven Grandfather/Grandmother teachings of the Anishinaabe.

[10]             Borrows, supra note 1 at 28.

[11]             Chapter Five is a curricular model; with stories of how land-based teachings have been employed at several law schools across Canada by Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars including folk at the University of Victoria, the Peter A. Allard School of Law, and Osgoode Hall Law School, amongst many.

[12]             These are some examples of “outsider” pedagogies that I have tried to take up in my courses and seminars at UVicLaw.

Xwelíqwiya – The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch

XweliqwiyaIn a recent conversation, Gillian Calder commented on how helpful she has found the IFLS blog (thanks Sonia Lawrence at Osgoode!), and particularly those posts titled “What we are doing/reading/thinking”.   These posts point/link to interesting texts (without worrying about doing the full out suggestion of how those texts might be used).  The posts do serve to get the creative juices running.  Gillian suggested that folks might consider doing something similar with #ReconciliationSyllabus.

In that spirit, I thought I would share some thoughts on a wonderful new book on my bookshelf: Xwelíqwiya – The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch.  While I haven’t fully sorted out full teaching materials using the book, I am convinced that it is a powerful resource for those thinking about TRC work in the law school.

The book is about the life of Rena Point Bolton.  Rena Point Bolton is, amongst other things, the mother of Steven Point, British Columbia’s first Indigneous Lieutenant Governor.  Rena is a force of nature herself.

The word “Xwelíqwiya”  in the title is her name in Halq’eméylem , the language of the Stó:lō people.

As the books explains, Stó:lō is the Halq’eméylem word for “river”, and the Stó:lō are the river people. In this case, the lower Fraser River.  In the summer, making the trip from Victoria to the Shuswap, the drive through Abbotsford, Harrison Hot Springs and Chiliwack is in fact a drive through Stó:lō territory (or, Stó:lō tém:éxw).

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Another great resource!

As is all too often the case, the first challenge for me was the limits of my own limited language fluency.  That is, the title.  I was just not sure how to pronounce Rena Point Bolton’s name in Halq’eméylem!  Richard Daly, the other co-author, gives a good approximation of how to do it, while acknowledging the challenges for English speakers, since nearly half of the sounds in the Halq’eméylem language don’t exist in English.  But the book invites the reader to nonetheless plunge in and try.

As an aside, Halq’eméylem has 8 different sounds for what in English is the letter “K”! (click here for a link to an interesting article on the expressive qualities of the language, and here for a link to the First Voices, website, where you can listen to and learn words in the language).  I found myself heading to my bookshelf to flip through my copy (well… the copy I lifted from my mom’s bookshelf?) of the award-winning Stó:lō-Coast Salish Historical Atlas.   It’s another great related resource to check out (click here for a link to a “good reads” review of the book).

But, back to Xwelíqwiya.  I have been practicing saying her name outloud, trying to put the sound of her language into my mouth.   I am still processing the book, but have found myself bringing it up in conversation on a daily basis since completing it.   There is so much in there that is interesting.  For today, here are a few comments.

Firstly, I have been increasingly looking for biographies and life histories of women.   There are some out there, but not nearly enough.  And there are CERTAINLY not enough books out there that engage with the lives of Indigenous women.  This book does that, situating Rena’s life in the flow of both Stó:lō history, and colonial history.  It does so in a way that engages with questions of land, language, lineage, class, marriage, child-raising, economy, culture, politics, and change.  Law is never far from the surface.

What was so remarkable was the way that the book was able to follow this one woman’s life over a period of 90 years in a way that personalized questions of history and politics.  Her story is told in a way that let me both have a sense of proximity to her “voice”, and simultaneoulsy contained the kind of “distance” necessary for a measured appreciation of the depth of her actions, her contributions, and her own learnings.

Second point?  This book left me reflecting on the power of its  two-voiced authorship.  This book was written collaboratively with social anthropologist Richard Daly.  At the beginning of the book, there is a discussion of the practice of joint-authorship used here.  They situate this decision against the background of Salish practices of legal governance: in the context of potlatchs and other important governance work, families will hire a Speaker — that is, someone who will speak publically on behalf of the family (rather than having the family themselves do the speaking).  They make visible that Richard Daly’s role in the project was theorized in this way — his role was very much like that of a Speaker.  There is much to be talked about in terms of the way the authorship of this book is thus an example of Salish practices of legal governance, enacted in a contemporary context, with a non-Stó:lō writer being asked to play a part in what is very much the operationalization of a Stó:lō way of living.

This book is largely written with future Stó:lō readers in mind (Rena says this explicitly), but it is also written in a way that invites the non-Stó:lō reader to join, to listen, and to begin to feel the different rhythms of Stó:lō  life, and to appreciate the power of culture, and of women’s place (historically and in contemporary society) in maintaining, promoting and developing social and legal life.  There is a section at the beginning that talks about the different conventions of reading for Stó:lō and settler readers, and what each can know about the other in order to have a productive conversation.  That was really helpful!

The book itself contains so much nuance and complexity about questions of identity, and of pragmatics, and of strategy.  It helped me get a better appreciation of the many ways that we are all actors in history, and of the many pathways that women have walked, and how sometimes those paths circle back to beginnings.  It also explicitly took up questions of silence — of how Indigenous people (and Indigenous women in particular) have experienced both silence and silencing, and of the politics of silence at different moments in time.  It asks us to understand the different meanings of silence, and to ask when the time might come to change some of our strategies.  Really powerful.

Lots to be said about this book, which I think is another of those must-have books.  It is certainly a true gift to those who are seeking to take up the challenge of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission for all Canadians to increase their cultural knowledge. Indeed, six of the Calls to Action place this goal at the centre of calls to “professionals”.  We see acknowledgement of the need for cultural competency in the six calls aimed at:

CallsToActionPDF

  • 23 – Health Care Professionals
  • 24 – Medical and Nursing Schools
  • 27 – Law Societies
  • 28 – Law Schools
  • 57 – Public Servants
  • 92 – The Corporate Sector

I came away from the book having had a taste of what it is to live within a Stó:lō life-world, and the beginnings of an appreciation for the rich history that is written on the land that I live on.  I also have an appreciation for the gift of story, and for this book’s invitation to understand the power and possibility of beginning to live in right-relation.  I love this book, and will be returning to it!  Take a look, and see what you think.   Or, maybe write us a post about something you are looking at these days?   Sharing what we are reading is one way to help us think about the project of decolonizing, and of diversifying the reading lists (particularly the required reading) in our courses.